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The No Valve Trumpet To Awaken To

The bugle is a small brass instrument that is basically a natural horn, because it has no valves or keys. One might wonder how the pitch is altered without any keys or valves; the pitch can be altered by controlling the air that the musician is blowing into the horn through closed lips. Blowing through closed lips is what creates the vibrations that make the sound. Of course, even with the ability to alter pitch manually without keys or valves, the instrument is fairly limited to a smaller range of notes it can make; which appears to be five notes at most.The bugle is a fairly simple instrument that was originally developed from instruments like the horn. The brass bugle has not changed much and still appears more or less the same today as it did when the first brass bugles were first created, though they have altered in appearance quite a bit from the original horns that came before the brass bugle. It would appear that it was and is most often used by the military in marching bands or signal calls that need...

 


What Is the Range of the B-Flat Tenor Trombone?

For the examples in this article, pitches are defined as middle C = C4.)Trombones Big and SmallTrombones come in many sizes. The B-flat tenor trombone comes with or without a trigger (F attachment). Bass trombones use triggers and paddles (an additional lever or trigger) or both. The contrabass trombone is larger and plays lower still. The smaller trombones include the alto trombone and treble or soprano trombone, sometimes called a slide trumpet. The piccolo trombone and sopranino trombone are even smaller.The most common trombone is perhaps the B-flat tenor trombone. You'll see these in almost every band and orchestra, playing every kind of music from Dixieland, Swing, Jazz, and marches, to trombone quartet music to classical brass quintet music to symphonic orchestral music. The B-Flat Tenor Trombone Range The B-flat tenor trombone is a tenor instrument—in the same general range as the human tenor voice, and thus given the name "tenor." The tenor trombone, however, has a bit more extended range than...

 


The Electric Guitar: From Big Band To Rock And Roll

Compared to its acoustic cousin, the electric guitar has a very short history. In modern times, electric guitars are most often associated with genres such as rock and roll, blues rock, and jazz. However, this instrument has its origins in the big band music of the 1930s and 1940s. As the jazz orchestras of those days grew and their brass sections increased proportionally, the need for an amplified guitar became more and more pronounced. Adolph Rickenbacher, George Beauchamp, and Paul Barth, all of who eventually founded the Electro String Company, are usually credited with the production of the first electric guitars around 1931. Whoever did it first, the eventual result was a guitar that used pickups to convert the vibrations of its steel strings into an electrical current, which was made louder with an instrument amplifier and speaker.As mentioned, an electric guitar's strings are always steel. This is, however, one of the few features shared by all the various types. Electric guitars come in a variety of ...

 




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